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A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI

Overview of attention for article published in European Spine Journal, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
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Title
A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI
Published in
European Spine Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00586-016-4393-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annemieke J. H. Verwoerd, Jan Mens, Abdelilah el Barzouhi, Wilco C. Peul, Bart W. Koes, Arianne P. Verhagen

Abstract

To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Unknown 50 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Researcher 7 13%
Student > Master 6 12%
Other 5 10%
Professor 4 8%
Other 13 25%
Unknown 10 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Sports and Recreations 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 16 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,511,141
of 17,428,793 outputs
Outputs from European Spine Journal
#145
of 4,095 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,321
of 349,525 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Spine Journal
#4
of 110 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,428,793 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,095 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,525 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 110 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.