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Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, December 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
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2 Wikipedia pages
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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48 Dimensions

Readers on

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186 Mendeley
Title
Bacteria are not the primary cause of bleaching in the Mediterranean coral Oculina patagonica
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, December 2007
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2007.88
Pubmed ID
Authors

T D Ainsworth, M Fine, G Roff, O Hoegh-Guldberg

Abstract

Coral bleaching occurs when the endosymbiosis between corals and their symbionts disintegrates during stress. Mass coral bleaching events have increased over the past 20 years and are directly correlated with periods of warm sea temperatures. However, some hypotheses have suggested that reef-building corals bleach due to infection by bacterial pathogens. The 'Bacterial Bleaching' hypothesis is based on laboratory studies of the Mediterranean invading coral, Oculina patagonica, and has further generated conclusions such as the coral probiotic hypothesis and coral hologenome theory of evolution. We aimed to investigate the natural microbial ecology of O. patagonica during the annual bleaching using fluorescence in situ hybridization to map bacterial populations within the coral tissue layers, and found that the coral bleaches on the temperate rocky reefs of the Israeli coastline without the presence of Vibrio shiloi or bacterial penetration of its tissue layers. Bacterial communities were found associated with the endolithic layer of bleached coral regions, and a community dominance shift from an apparent cyanobacterial-dominated endolithic layer to an algal-dominated layer was found in bleached coral samples. While bacterial communities certainly play important roles in coral stasis and health, we suggest environmental stressors, such as those documented with reef-building corals, are the primary triggers leading to bleaching of O. patagonica and suggest that bacterial involvement in patterns of bleaching is that of opportunistic colonization.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 186 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Belgium 3 2%
Canada 3 2%
Mexico 3 2%
Portugal 2 1%
New Zealand 2 1%
Australia 2 1%
Netherlands 2 1%
Germany 2 1%
Other 11 6%
Unknown 152 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 53 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 38 20%
Student > Master 27 15%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Professor 13 7%
Other 36 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 128 69%
Environmental Science 30 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 5%
Unspecified 7 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 4%
Other 5 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2013.
All research outputs
#327,299
of 3,634,915 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#192
of 950 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,207
of 231,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#5
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,634,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 950 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 231,923 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.