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The Oncogenic EWS-FLI1 Protein Binds In Vivo GGAA Microsatellite Sequences with Potential Transcriptional Activation Function

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, March 2009
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Title
The Oncogenic EWS-FLI1 Protein Binds In Vivo GGAA Microsatellite Sequences with Potential Transcriptional Activation Function
Published in
PLoS ONE, March 2009
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0004932
Pubmed ID
Authors

Noëlle Guillon, Franck Tirode, Valentina Boeva, Andrei Zynovyev, Emmanuel Barillot, Olivier Delattre

Abstract

The fusion between EWS and ETS family members is a key oncogenic event in Ewing tumors and important EWS-FLI1 target genes have been identified. However, until now, the search for EWS-FLI1 targets has been limited to promoter regions and no genome-wide comprehensive analysis of in vivo EWS-FLI1 binding sites has been undertaken. Using a ChIP-Seq approach to investigate EWS-FLI1-bound DNA sequences in two Ewing cell lines, we show that this chimeric transcription factor preferentially binds two types of sequences including consensus ETS motifs and microsatellite sequences. Most bound sites are found outside promoter regions. Microsatellites containing more than 9 GGAA repeats are very significantly enriched in EWS-FLI1 immunoprecipitates. Moreover, in reporter gene experiments, the transcription activation is highly dependent upon the number of repeats that are included in the construct. Importantly, in vivo EWS-FLI1-bound microsatellites are significantly associated with EWS-FLI1-driven gene activation. Put together, these results point out the likely contribution of microsatellite elements to long-distance transcription regulation and to oncogenesis.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Canada 2 3%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 54 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 21 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 31%
Student > Master 7 11%
Professor 3 5%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 6%
Unspecified 3 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 April 2009.
All research outputs
#7,554,900
of 12,088,621 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#80,121
of 132,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,082
of 258,457 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,066
of 3,647 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,088,621 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 132,962 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 3,647 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.