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The association between BMI development among young children and (un)healthy food choices in response to food advertisements: a longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
201 Mendeley
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Title
The association between BMI development among young children and (un)healthy food choices in response to food advertisements: a longitudinal study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0340-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Frans Folkvord, Doeschka J. Anschütz, Moniek Buijzen

Abstract

Previous studies have focused on the acute effects of food advertisements on the caloric intake of children; however, the long-term effects of this food cue reactivity on weight gain have not been examined. The main aim of this study was to explore if reactivity to food cues in an advertisement was associated with weight status two years later. Children wo had previously taken part in an experiment investigating the impact of advergames on food intake had their height and weight re-measured two years later, for assessment of body mass index (BMI). A within-subject design was used to test the associations between food choices and BMI over time. In the previous experiment, children played an advergame that promoted energy-dense snacks, fruit, or nonfood products, or did not play an advergame (control condition). After playing the game, the free intake of energy-dense snacks and fruits was measured. Children who ate more apple after playing an advergame promoting energy-dense snacks had a lower BMI two years later. Consumption of energy-dense snacks after playing an advergame promoting energy-dense snacks was not associated with BMI two years later. In other condition, no association was found between food intake and BMI after two years . The findings suggest that coping with environmental cues that trigger unhealthy eating behavior is associated with the body mass index of young children two years later. This might imply that learning to respond to food cues by choosing healthy options might prevent children from excessive weight gain. This trial was registered at as ISRCTN17013832 .

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 201 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 201 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 36 18%
Student > Master 33 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 10%
Researcher 16 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 5%
Other 37 18%
Unknown 48 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 14%
Psychology 19 9%
Social Sciences 16 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 5%
Other 41 20%
Unknown 53 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2017.
All research outputs
#3,212,066
of 22,487,039 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1,101
of 1,907 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,267
of 381,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#9
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,487,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,907 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.4. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 381,524 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.