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Malaria vectors and their blood-meal sources in an area of high bed net ownership in the western Kenya highlands

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
79 Mendeley
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Title
Malaria vectors and their blood-meal sources in an area of high bed net ownership in the western Kenya highlands
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1115-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bryson A. Ndenga, Nicholas L. Mulaya, Sandra K. Musaki, Joan N. Shiroko, Stefan Dongus, Ulrike Fillinger

Abstract

Blood-meal sources of malaria vectors affect their capacity to transmit the disease. Most efficient malaria vectors prefer human hosts. However, with increasing personal protection measures it becomes more difficult for them to find human hosts. Here recent malaria vector blood-meal sources in western Kenya highlands were investigated. Adult mosquitoes resting indoors, outdoors and exiting through windows were collected in three study areas within the western Kenya highlands from June 2011 to June 2013. A census of people, livestock and of insecticide-treated nets was done per house. Mosquito blood-meal sources were determined as human, goat, bovine or chicken using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays. Most (86.3 %) households possessed at least one bed net, 57.2 % had domesticated animals and 83.6 % had people sharing houses with livestock at night. Most (94.9 %) unfed malaria vectors were caught exiting through windows. Overall, 53.1 % of Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto obtained blood-meals from humans, 26.5 % from goats and 18.4 % from bovines. Single blood-meal sources by An. gambiae s.s. from humans were 26.5 %, 8.2 % from bovines and 2.0 % from goats. Mixed blood-meal sources by An. gambiae s.s. identified included: 24.5 % human/goat, 10.2 % human/bovine, 8.2 % human/bovine/goat and also 8.2 % bovine/goat. One An. arabiensis mosquito obtained blood-meal only from humans. An unusually high frequency of animal and mixed human-animal blood meals in the major malaria vector An. gambiae s.s. was revealed in the western Kenya highlands where bed net coverage is above the WHO target. The shift in blood-meal sources from humans to livestock is most likely the vectors' response to increased bed net coverage and the close location of livestock frequently in the same house as people at night. Livestock-targeted interventions should be considered under these circumstances to address residual malaria transmission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 78 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 23%
Researcher 17 22%
Student > Master 14 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 6%
Student > Postgraduate 5 6%
Other 7 9%
Unknown 13 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 8%
Environmental Science 4 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 16 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2018.
All research outputs
#472,424
of 13,628,925 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#64
of 3,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,575
of 338,092 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,628,925 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,970 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,092 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them