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An open letter toThe BMJeditors on qualitative research

Overview of attention for article published in British Medical Journal, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2019 tweeters
facebook
19 Facebook pages
googleplus
3 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
148 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
414 Mendeley
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Title
An open letter toThe BMJeditors on qualitative research
Published in
British Medical Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmj.i563
Pubmed ID
Authors

Trisha Greenhalgh, Ellen Annandale, Richard Ashcroft, James Barlow, Nick Black, Alan Bleakley, Ruth Boaden, Jeffrey Braithwaite, Nicky Britten, Franco Carnevale, Kath Checkland, Julianne Cheek, Alex Clark, Simon Cohn, Jack Coulehan, Benjamin Crabtree, Steven Cummins, Frank Davidoff, Huw Davies, Robert Dingwall, Mary Dixon-Woods, Glyn Elwyn, Eivind Engebretsen, Ewan Ferlie, Naomi Fulop, John Gabbay, Marie-Pierre Gagnon, Dariusz Galasinski, Ruth Garside, Lucy Gilson, Peter Griffiths, Penny Hawe, Jan-Kees Helderman, Brian Hodges, David Hunter, Margaret Kearney, Celia Kitzinger, Jenny Kitzinger, Ayelet Kuper, Saville Kushner, Andree Le May, France Legare, Lorelei Lingard, Louise Locock, Jill Maben, Mary Ellen Macdonald, Frances Mair, Russell Mannion, Martin Marshall, Carl May, Nicholas Mays, Lorna McKee, Marissa Miraldo, David Morgan, Janice Morse, Sarah Nettleton, Sandy Oliver, Warrren Pearce, Pierre Pluye, Catherine Pope, Glenn Robert, Celia Roberts, Stefania Rodella, Jo Rycroft-Malone, Margarete Sandelowski, Paul Shekelle, Fiona Stevenson, Sharon Straus, Deborah Swinglehurst, Sally Thorne, Göran Tomson, Gerd Westert, Sue Wilkinson, Brian Williams, Terry Young, Sue Ziebland

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,019 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 414 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 6 1%
Canada 3 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Slovenia 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 398 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 75 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 18%
Researcher 55 13%
Professor 33 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 33 8%
Other 95 23%
Unknown 49 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 117 28%
Social Sciences 76 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 60 14%
Psychology 27 7%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 3%
Other 49 12%
Unknown 74 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1243. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2020.
All research outputs
#4,411
of 16,086,890 outputs
Outputs from British Medical Journal
#132
of 49,969 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99
of 347,060 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Medical Journal
#3
of 916 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,086,890 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 49,969 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 347,060 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 916 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.