All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD)

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
28 news outlets
blogs
8 blogs
twitter
47 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
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Title
All Roads Lead to Rome: Exploring Human Migration to the Eternal City through Biochemistry of Skeletons from Two Imperial-Era Cemeteries (1st-3rd c AD)
Published in
PLoS ONE, February 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0147585
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kristina Killgrove, Janet Montgomery

Abstract

Migration within the Roman Empire occurred at multiple scales and was engaged in both voluntarily and involuntarily. Because of the lengthy tradition of classical studies, bioarchaeological analyses must be fully contextualized within the bounds of history, material culture, and epigraphy. In order to assess migration to Rome within an updated contextual framework, strontium isotope analysis was performed on 105 individuals from two cemeteries associated with Imperial Rome-Casal Bertone and Castellaccio Europarco-and oxygen and carbon isotope analyses were performed on a subset of 55 individuals. Statistical analysis and comparisons with expected local ranges found several outliers who likely immigrated to Rome from elsewhere. Demographics of the immigrants show men and children migrated, and a comparison of carbon isotopes from teeth and bone samples suggests the immigrants may have significantly changed their diet. These data represent the first physical evidence of individual migrants to Imperial Rome. This case study demonstrates the importance of employing bioarchaeology to generate a deeper understanding of a complex ancient urban center.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 47 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Russian Federation 1 3%
Portugal 1 3%
Luxembourg 1 3%
Unknown 34 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 36%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Postgraduate 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Researcher 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Arts and Humanities 13 33%
Social Sciences 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Environmental Science 2 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Other 10 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 304. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2017.
All research outputs
#15,020
of 7,374,598 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#443
of 105,523 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,372
of 322,784 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#31
of 5,376 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,374,598 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 105,523 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 322,784 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,376 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.