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Prey choice and habitat use drive sea otter pathogen exposure in a resource-limited coastal system

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Citations

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84 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
349 Mendeley
connotea
1 Connotea
Title
Prey choice and habitat use drive sea otter pathogen exposure in a resource-limited coastal system
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2009
DOI 10.1073/pnas.0806449106
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. K. Johnson, M. T. Tinker, J. A. Estes, P. A. Conrad, M. Staedler, M. A. Miller, D. A. Jessup, J. A. K. Mazet

Abstract

The processes promoting disease in wild animal populations are highly complex, yet identifying these processes is critically important for conservation when disease is limiting a population. By combining field studies with epidemiologic tools, we evaluated the relationship between key factors impeding southern sea otter (Enhydra lutris nereis) population growth: disease and resource limitation. This threatened population has struggled to recover despite protection, so we followed radio-tagged sea otters and evaluated infection with 2 disease-causing protozoal pathogens, Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona, to reveal risks that increased the likelihood of pathogen exposure. We identified patterns of pathogen infection that are linked to individual animal behavior, prey choice, and habitat use. We detected a high-risk spatial cluster of S. neurona infections in otters with home ranges in southern Monterey Bay and a coastal segment near San Simeon and Cambria where otters had high levels of infection with T. gondii. We found that otters feeding on abalone, which is the preferred prey in a resource-abundant marine ecosystem, had a very low risk of infection with either pathogen, whereas otters consuming small marine snails were more likely to be infected with T. gondii. Individual dietary specialization in sea otters is an adaptive mechanism for coping with limited food resources along central coastal California. High levels of infection with protozoal pathogens may be an adverse consequence of dietary specialization in this threatened species, with both depleted resources and disease working synergistically to limit recovery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 349 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 5%
Brazil 7 2%
United Kingdom 4 1%
India 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Other 10 3%
Unknown 301 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 73 21%
Researcher 71 20%
Student > Master 63 18%
Student > Bachelor 37 11%
Other 22 6%
Other 64 18%
Unknown 19 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 210 60%
Environmental Science 69 20%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 1%
Other 13 4%
Unknown 30 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2019.
All research outputs
#958,300
of 14,381,489 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#15,022
of 82,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,139
of 212,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#146
of 777 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,381,489 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 82,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,800 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 777 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.