↓ Skip to main content

Activation of the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor through Conformational Rearrangement of Disulphide-Linked Receptor Dimers

Overview of attention for article published in Neuron, April 2009
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

patent
5 patents
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
108 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
111 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Activation of the p75 Neurotrophin Receptor through Conformational Rearrangement of Disulphide-Linked Receptor Dimers
Published in
Neuron, April 2009
DOI 10.1016/j.neuron.2009.02.020
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marçal Vilar, Ioannis Charalampopoulos, Rajappa S. Kenchappa, Anastasia Simi, Esra Karaca, Alessandra Reversi, Soyoung Choi, Mark Bothwell, Ismael Mingarro, Wilma J. Friedman, Giampietro Schiavo, Philippe I.H. Bastiaens, Peter J. Verveer, Bruce D. Carter, Carlos F. Ibáñez

Abstract

Ligand-mediated dimerization has emerged as a universal mechanism of growth factor receptor activation. Neurotrophins interact with dimers of the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), but the mechanism of receptor activation has remained elusive. Here, we show that p75(NTR) forms disulphide-linked dimers independently of neurotrophin binding through the highly conserved Cys(257) in its transmembrane domain. Mutation of Cys(257) abolished neurotrophin-dependent receptor activity but did not affect downstream signaling by the p75(NTR)/NgR/Lingo-1 complex in response to MAG, indicating the existence of distinct, ligand-specific activation mechanisms for p75(NTR). FRET experiments revealed a close association of p75(NTR) intracellular domains that was transiently disrupted by conformational changes induced upon NGF binding. Although mutation of Cys(257) did not alter the oligomeric state of p75(NTR), the mutant receptor was no longer able to propagate conformational changes to the cytoplasmic domain upon ligand binding. We propose that neurotrophins activate p75(NTR) by a mechanism involving rearrangement of disulphide-linked receptor subunits.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 111 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
France 2 2%
Sweden 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 104 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 25%
Researcher 23 21%
Student > Bachelor 15 14%
Professor 8 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 6%
Other 20 18%
Unknown 10 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 48 43%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 21 19%
Neuroscience 17 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 5%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2020.
All research outputs
#3,093,629
of 17,360,236 outputs
Outputs from Neuron
#3,725
of 8,287 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,940
of 224,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuron
#38
of 101 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,360,236 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,287 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 26.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 224,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 101 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.