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Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
10 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
167 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
394 Mendeley
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Title
Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, February 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1512650113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew J. Cohen, Irena F. Creed, Laurie Alexander, Nandita B. Basu, Aram J. K. Calhoun, Christopher Craft, Ellen D’Amico, Edward DeKeyser, Laurie Fowler, Heather E. Golden, James W. Jawitz, Peter Kalla, L. Katherine Kirkman, Charles R. Lane, Megan Lang, Scott G. Leibowitz, David Bruce Lewis, John Marton, Daniel L. McLaughlin, David M. Mushet, Hadas Raanan-Kiperwas, Mark C. Rains, Lora Smith, Susan C. Walls

Abstract

Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 394 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Saudi Arabia 1 <1%
Taiwan 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 384 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 81 21%
Researcher 72 18%
Student > Master 67 17%
Student > Bachelor 38 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 23 6%
Other 62 16%
Unknown 51 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 155 39%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 84 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 45 11%
Engineering 20 5%
Social Sciences 3 <1%
Other 11 3%
Unknown 76 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2020.
All research outputs
#1,237,917
of 17,165,110 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#17,977
of 88,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,314
of 349,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#389
of 868 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,165,110 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,872 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 349,983 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 868 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.