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Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
wikipedia
4 Wikipedia pages
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
239 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
486 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Strong evidence for terrestrial support of zooplankton in small lakes based on stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2011
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1012807108
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan J. Cole, Stephen R. Carpenter, Jim Kitchell, Michael L. Pace, Christopher T. Solomon, Brian Weidel

Abstract

Cross-ecosystem subsidies to food webs can alter metabolic balances in the receiving (subsidized) system and free the food web, or particular consumers, from the energetic constraints of local primary production. Although cross-ecosystem subsidies between terrestrial and aquatic systems have been well recognized for benthic organisms in streams, rivers, and the littoral zones of lakes, terrestrial subsidies to pelagic consumers are more difficult to demonstrate and remain controversial. Here, we adopt a unique approach by using stable isotopes of H, C, and N to estimate terrestrial support to zooplankton in two contrasting lakes. Zooplankton (Holopedium, Daphnia, and Leptodiaptomus) are comprised of ≈ 20-40% of organic material of terrestrial origin. These estimates are as high as, or higher than, prior measures obtained by experimentally manipulating the inorganic (13)C content of these lakes to augment the small, natural contrast in (13)C between terrestrial and algal photosynthesis. Our study gives credence to a growing literature, which we review here, suggesting that significant terrestrial support of pelagic crustaceans (zooplankton) is widespread.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 486 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 19 4%
Canada 9 2%
South Africa 4 <1%
Germany 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
India 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Other 7 1%
Unknown 436 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 116 24%
Researcher 103 21%
Student > Master 76 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 35 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 31 6%
Other 84 17%
Unknown 41 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 202 42%
Environmental Science 147 30%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 46 9%
Chemistry 7 1%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 <1%
Other 14 3%
Unknown 66 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2021.
All research outputs
#2,810,856
of 20,034,281 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#31,160
of 93,623 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,406
of 242,688 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#279
of 804 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,034,281 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 93,623 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 33.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,688 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 804 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.