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The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass

Overview of attention for article published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Citations

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Title
The annual cycles of phytoplankton biomass
Published in
Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, September 2010
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2010.0125
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Winder, J. E. Cloern

Abstract

Terrestrial plants are powerful climate sentinels because their annual cycles of growth, reproduction and senescence are finely tuned to the annual climate cycle having a period of one year. Consistency in the seasonal phasing of terrestrial plant activity provides a relatively low-noise background from which phenological shifts can be detected and attributed to climate change. Here, we ask whether phytoplankton biomass also fluctuates over a consistent annual cycle in lake, estuarine-coastal and ocean ecosystems and whether there is a characteristic phenology of phytoplankton as a consistent phase and amplitude of variability. We compiled 125 time series of phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a concentration) from temperate and subtropical zones and used wavelet analysis to extract their dominant periods of variability and the recurrence strength at those periods. Fewer than half (48%) of the series had a dominant 12-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the canonical spring-bloom pattern. About 20 per cent had a dominant six-month period of variability, commonly expressed as the spring and autumn or winter and summer blooms of temperate lakes and oceans. These annual patterns varied in recurrence strength across sites, and did not persist over the full series duration at some sites. About a third of the series had no component of variability at either the six- or 12-month period, reflecting a series of irregular pulses of biomass. These findings show that there is high variability of annual phytoplankton cycles across ecosystems, and that climate-driven annual cycles can be obscured by other drivers of population variability, including human disturbance, aperiodic weather events and strong trophic coupling between phytoplankton and their consumers. Regulation of phytoplankton biomass by multiple processes operating at multiple time scales adds complexity to the challenge of detecting climate-driven trends in aquatic ecosystems where the noise to signal ratio is high.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 310 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 7 2%
Germany 6 2%
Italy 4 1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Argentina 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
Other 9 3%
Unknown 276 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 86 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 81 26%
Student > Master 36 12%
Student > Bachelor 26 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 19 6%
Other 62 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 127 41%
Environmental Science 88 28%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 47 15%
Unspecified 27 9%
Engineering 6 2%
Other 15 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2015.
All research outputs
#467,040
of 12,367,425 outputs
Outputs from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#456
of 4,540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,605
of 226,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#20
of 138 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,367,425 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,339 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 138 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.