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Active commuting and perceptions of the route environment: A longitudinal analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Preventive Medicine, October 2014
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Mentioned by

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1 tweeter

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Active commuting and perceptions of the route environment: A longitudinal analysis
Published in
Preventive Medicine, October 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.06.033
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jenna Panter, Simon Griffin, David Ogilvie

Abstract

To assess associations between changes in perceptions of the environment en route to work and changes in active commuting. 655 commuters in Cambridge, UK reported perceptions of their commuting route and past-week commuting trips in postal questionnaires in 2009 and 2010. Associations between changes in route perceptions and changes in time spent walking and cycling, proportion of car trips, and switching to or from the car on the commute were modelled using multivariable regression. Changes in only a few perceptions were associated with changes in travel behaviour. Commuters who reported that it became less pleasant to walk recorded a 6% (95% CI: 1, 11) net increase in car trips and a 12 min/week (95% CI: -1, -24) net decrease in walking. Increases in the perceived danger of cycling or of crossing the road were also associated with increases in car trips. Increases in the perceived convenience of public transport (OR: 3.31, 95% CI: 1.27, 8.63) or safety of cycling (OR: 3.70, 95% CI: 1.44, 9.50) were associated with taking up alternatives to the car. Interventions to improve the safety of routes and convenience of public transport may help promote active commuting and should be evaluated.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 70 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 26%
Researcher 14 19%
Unspecified 13 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 21 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Social Sciences 10 14%
Sports and Recreations 5 7%
Engineering 5 7%
Other 19 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2017.
All research outputs
#8,180,136
of 13,046,839 outputs
Outputs from Preventive Medicine
#2,770
of 3,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,941
of 336,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Preventive Medicine
#21
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,046,839 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,294 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 336,568 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.