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A single-cell view of ammonium assimilation in coral–dinoflagellate symbiosis

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2012
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4 tweeters

Citations

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97 Dimensions

Readers on

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174 Mendeley
Title
A single-cell view of ammonium assimilation in coral–dinoflagellate symbiosis
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, January 2012
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2011.196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathieu Pernice, Anders Meibom, Annamieke Van Den Heuvel, Christophe Kopp, Isabelle Domart-Coulon, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Sophie Dove

Abstract

Assimilation of inorganic nitrogen from nutrient-poor tropical seas is an essential challenge for the endosymbiosis between reef-building corals and dinoflagellates. Despite the clear evidence that reef-building corals can use ammonium as inorganic nitrogen source, the dynamics and precise roles of host and symbionts in this fundamental process remain unclear. Here, we combine high spatial resolution ion microprobe imaging (NanoSIMS) and pulse-chase isotopic labeling in order to track the dynamics of ammonium incorporation within the intact symbiosis between the reef-building coral Acropora aspera and its dinoflagellate symbionts. We demonstrate that both dinoflagellate and animal cells have the capacity to rapidly fix nitrogen from seawater enriched in ammonium (in less than one hour). Further, by establishing the relative strengths of the capability to assimilate nitrogen for each cell compartment, we infer that dinoflagellate symbionts can fix 14 to 23 times more nitrogen than their coral host cells in response to a sudden pulse of ammonium-enriched seawater. Given the importance of nitrogen in cell maintenance, growth and functioning, the capability to fix ammonium from seawater into the symbiotic system may be a key component of coral nutrition. Interestingly, this metabolic response appears to be triggered rapidly by episodic nitrogen availability. The methods and results presented in this study open up for the exploration of dynamics and spatial patterns associated with metabolic activities and nutritional interactions in a multitude of organisms that live in symbiotic relationships.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
Brazil 2 1%
France 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 167 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 30%
Researcher 33 19%
Student > Master 25 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 10%
Unspecified 15 9%
Other 31 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 96 55%
Environmental Science 30 17%
Unspecified 21 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 7%
Chemistry 4 2%
Other 11 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 January 2012.
All research outputs
#7,043,814
of 12,253,260 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#1,662
of 1,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,811
of 240,934 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#24
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,253,260 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.9. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,934 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.