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Qualitative study of views and experiences of performance management for healthcare-associated infections

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hospital Infection, September 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
54 tweeters

Citations

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16 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Qualitative study of views and experiences of performance management for healthcare-associated infections
Published in
Journal of Hospital Infection, September 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jhin.2016.01.021
Pubmed ID
Authors

L. Brewster, C. Tarrant, M. Dixon-Woods

Abstract

Centrally led performance management regimes using standard setting, monitoring, and incentives have become a prominent feature of infection prevention and control (IPC) in health systems. To characterize views and experiences of regulation and performance management relating to IPC in English hospitals. Two qualitative datasets containing 139 interviews with healthcare workers and managers were analysed. Data directly relevant to performance management and IPC were extracted. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Participants reported that performance management regimes had mobilized action around specific infections. The benefits of establishing organizational structures of accountability were seen in empirical evidence of decreasing infection rates. Performance management was not, however, experienced as wholly benign, and setting targets in one area was seen to involve risks of 'tunnel vision' and the marginalization of other potentially important issues. Financial sanctions were viewed especially negatively; performance management was associated with risks of creating a culture of fearfulness, suppressing learning and disrupting inter-professional relationships. Centrally led performance management may have some important roles in IPC, but identifying where it is appropriate and determining its limits is critical. Persisting with harsh regimes may affect relationships and increase resistance to continued improvement efforts, but leaving all improvement to local teams may also be a flawed strategy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 54 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 21%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Unspecified 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Other 22 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 18%
Business, Management and Accounting 12 17%
Unspecified 11 15%
Social Sciences 8 11%
Other 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 November 2016.
All research outputs
#556,080
of 13,384,723 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hospital Infection
#65
of 2,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,460
of 338,242 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hospital Infection
#2
of 41 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,384,723 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,480 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 338,242 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 41 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.