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Ecoregional Analysis of Nearshore Sea-Surface Temperature in the North Pacific

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Ecoregional Analysis of Nearshore Sea-Surface Temperature in the North Pacific
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0030105
Pubmed ID
Authors

Meredith C. Payne, Cheryl A. Brown, Deborah A. Reusser, Henry Lee

Abstract

The quantification and description of sea surface temperature (SST) is critically important because it can influence the distribution, migration, and invasion of marine species; furthermore, SSTs are expected to be affected by climate change. To better understand present temperature regimes, we assembled a 29-year nearshore time series of mean monthly SSTs along the North Pacific coastline using remotely-sensed satellite data collected with the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. We then used the dataset to describe nearshore (<20 km offshore) SST patterns of 16 North Pacific ecoregions delineated by the Marine Ecoregions of the World (MEOW) hierarchical schema. Annual mean temperature varied from 3.8°C along the Kamchatka ecoregion to 24.8°C in the Cortezian ecoregion. There are smaller annual ranges and less variability in SST in the Northeast Pacific relative to the Northwest Pacific. Within the 16 ecoregions, 31-94% of the variance in SST is explained by the annual cycle, with the annual cycle explaining the least variation in the Northern California ecoregion and the most variation in the Yellow Sea ecoregion. Clustering on mean monthly SSTs of each ecoregion showed a clear break between the ecoregions within the Warm and Cold Temperate provinces of the MEOW schema, though several of the ecoregions contained within the provinces did not show a significant difference in mean seasonal temperature patterns. Comparison of these temperature patterns shared some similarities and differences with previous biogeographic classifications and the Large Marine Ecosystems (LMEs). Finally, we provide a web link to the processed data for use by other researchers.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 38 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 8 19%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 45%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 8 19%
Environmental Science 7 17%
Engineering 2 5%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 2 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2012.
All research outputs
#2,721,049
of 12,368,370 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#35,013
of 135,657 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,371
of 223,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#870
of 3,848 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,368,370 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 135,657 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 223,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,848 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.