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Metabolic engineering of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 for removal of Clostridium butyricum growth inhibitors produced from lignocellulosic hydrolysates

Overview of attention for article published in Biotechnology for Biofuels, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Metabolic engineering of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 for removal of Clostridium butyricum growth inhibitors produced from lignocellulosic hydrolysates
Published in
Biotechnology for Biofuels, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13068-015-0389-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matti S. Kannisto, Rahul K. Mangayil, Ankita Shrivastava-Bhattacharya, Brett I. Pletschke, Matti T. Karp, Ville P. Santala

Abstract

Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass can produce inhibitory compounds that are harmful for microorganisms used in the production of biofuels and other chemicals from lignocellulosic sugars. Selective inhibitor removal can be achieved with biodetoxification where microorganisms catabolize the inhibitors without consuming the sugars. We engineered the strictly aerobic Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 for detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates by removing the gene for glucose dehydrogenase, gcd, which catalyzes the first step in its glucose catabolism. The engineered A. baylyi ADP1 strain was shown to be incapable of consuming the main sugar components of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, i.e., glucose, xylose, and arabinose, but rapidly utilized acetate and formate. Formate was consumed during growth on acetate and by stationary phase cells, and this was enhanced in the presence of a common aromatic inhibitor of lignocellulosic hydrolysates, 4-hydroxybenzoate. The engineered strain tolerated glucose well up to 70 g/l, and the consumption of glucose, xylose, or arabinose was not observed in prolonged cultivations. The engineered strain was applied in removal of oxygen, a gaseous inhibitor of anaerobic fermentations. Co-cultivation with the A. baylyi ADP1 gcd knockout strain under initially aerobic conditions allowed the strictly anaerobic Clostridium butyricum to grow and produce hydrogen (H2) from sugars of the enzymatic rice straw hydrolysate. We demonstrated that the model organism of bacterial genetics and metabolism, A. baylyi ADP1, could be engineered to be an efficient biodetoxification strain of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Only one gene knockout was required to completely eliminate sugar consumption and the strain could be used in production of anaerobic conditions for the strictly anaerobic hydrogen producer, C. butyricum. Because of these encouraging results, we believe that A. baylyi ADP1 is a promising candidate for the detoxification of lignocellulosic hydrolysates for bioprocesses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 46 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 32%
Researcher 9 19%
Unspecified 7 15%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Master 4 9%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 23%
Unspecified 7 15%
Engineering 4 9%
Chemical Engineering 4 9%
Other 4 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,824,065
of 12,361,035 outputs
Outputs from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#153
of 960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,215
of 339,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biotechnology for Biofuels
#7
of 87 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,361,035 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 960 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 339,759 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 87 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.