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The Role of Sequential Pneumatic Compression in Limb Salvage in Non-reconstructable Critical Limb Ischemia

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, April 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
The Role of Sequential Pneumatic Compression in Limb Salvage in Non-reconstructable Critical Limb Ischemia
Published in
European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.ejvs.2015.12.025
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. Zaki, M. Elsherif, W. Tawfick, M. El Sharkawy, N. Hynes, S. Sultan

Abstract

Critical limb ischemia (CLI) is an increasingly alarming presentation of advanced generalized circulatory failure. Most patients presenting with CLI have profound cardiovascular comorbidities that hinder surgical intervention. Moreover, some patients present with non-reconstructable arterial anatomy. For this vulnerable cohort, primary amputation is often the only available option. This study aims at answering the question: Can sequential pneumatic compression (SPC) preclude amputation? A retrospective analysis of 187 patients (262 limbs) prescribed the Artassist SPC compared outcomes between the group of patients who acquired the device and those who did not. The primary end point was limb salvage; secondary end points were amputation-free survival and improvement in toe pressures. The mean age was 74.78 years, the median follow-up was 16 months, and the median duration of usage was 4 months. 81.72% of the patient acquired the device and 18.28% did not. The mean toe pressure was 61.4 mmHg pre-application, and 65 mmHg after application (p = .071). Amputation-free survival was 98% and 96% for those who acquired the device and 90% and 84% for those who did not at 6 and 12 months, respectively. There was a non-significant association between limb salvage and device acquisition (p = .714); however, there was a significant improvement in rest pain (p < .0001), reduction in minor amputation (p = .023), and amputation-free survival associated with using the device (p = .01). Although limb salvage is the paramount ambition for patients referred to vascular services, some patients with CLI are better served with primary amputation. Although the mechanism of SPC action is still ambiguous, there is strong evidence to support its role in preventing minor amputation, prolonging amputation-free survival, and improving rest pain in patients with non-reconstructable CLI; nevertheless, its role in prevention of major amputation lacks statistical significance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 19%
Other 5 16%
Researcher 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 9 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 48%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 10%
Psychology 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Unknown 11 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,767,555
of 14,568,570 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
#259
of 1,479 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,070
of 268,519 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
#7
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,568,570 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,479 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,519 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.