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Adaptation to abiotic conditions drives local adaptation in bacteria and viruses coevolving in heterogeneous environments

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Adaptation to abiotic conditions drives local adaptation in bacteria and viruses coevolving in heterogeneous environments
Published in
Biology Letters, February 2016
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0879
Pubmed ID
Authors

Florien A. Gorter, Pauline D. Scanlan, Angus Buckling

Abstract

Parasite local adaptation, the greater performance of parasites on their local compared with foreign hosts, has important consequences for the maintenance of diversity and epidemiology. While the abiotic environment may significantly affect local adaptation, most studies to date have failed either to incorporate the effects of the abiotic environment, or to separate them from those of the biotic environment. Here, we tease apart biotic and abiotic components of local adaptation using the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and its viral parasite bacteriophage Φ2. We coevolved replicate populations of bacteria and phages at three different temperatures, and determined their performance against coevolutionary partners from the same and different temperatures. Crucially, we measured performance at different assay temperatures, which allowed us to disentangle adaptation to biotic and abiotic habitat components. Our results show that bacteria and phages are more resistant and infectious, respectively, at the temperature at which they previously coevolved, confirming that local adaptation to abiotic conditions can play a crucial role in determining parasite infectivity and host resistance. Our work underlines the need to assess host-parasite interactions across multiple relevant abiotic environments, and suggests that microbial adaption to local temperatures can create ecological barriers to dispersal across temperature gradients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 2 3%
United States 1 1%
France 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 72 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 32%
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Master 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Lecturer 4 5%
Other 12 16%
Unknown 11 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 48%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 10%
Environmental Science 6 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Engineering 4 5%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 11 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2016.
All research outputs
#5,560,555
of 18,812,015 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#2,142
of 2,962 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,865
of 273,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#50
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,812,015 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,962 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.8. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,109 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.