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Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
34 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
Title
Chronic consumption of a western diet induces robust glial activation in aging mice and in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease
Published in
Scientific Reports, February 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep21568
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leah C. Graham, Jeffrey M. Harder, Ileana Soto, Wilhelmine N. de Vries, Simon W. M. John, Gareth R. Howell

Abstract

Studies have assessed individual components of a western diet, but no study has assessed the long-term, cumulative effects of a western diet on aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, we have formulated the first western-style diet that mimics the fat, carbohydrate, protein, vitamin and mineral levels of western diets. This diet was fed to aging C57BL/6J (B6) mice to identify phenotypes that may increase susceptibility to AD, and to APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD, to determine the effects of the diet in AD. Astrocytosis and microglia/monocyte activation were dramatically increased in response to diet and was further increased in APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet. This increase in glial responses was associated with increased plaque burden in the hippocampus. Interestingly, given recent studies highlighting the importance of TREM2 in microglia/monocytes in AD susceptibility and progression, B6 and APP/PS1 mice fed the western diet showed significant increases TREM2+ microglia/monocytes. Therefore, an increase in TREM2+ microglia/monocytes may underlie the increased risk from a western diet to age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. This study lays the foundation to fully investigate the impact of a western diet on glial responses in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
France 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 83 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 25%
Student > Bachelor 17 19%
Student > Master 17 19%
Researcher 17 19%
Unspecified 4 4%
Other 12 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 30%
Neuroscience 24 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 10%
Unspecified 6 7%
Other 11 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 82. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2017.
All research outputs
#158,781
of 11,880,222 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#2,037
of 52,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,394
of 292,991 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#177
of 3,171 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,880,222 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 52,626 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,991 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,171 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.