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Effects of Ocean Acidification on Learning in Coral Reef Fishes

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, February 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
91 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
247 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of Ocean Acidification on Learning in Coral Reef Fishes
Published in
PLoS ONE, February 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0031478
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maud C. O. Ferrari, Rachel P. Manassa, Danielle L. Dixson, Philip L. Munday, Mark I. McCormick, Mark G. Meekan, Andrew Sih, Douglas P. Chivers

Abstract

Ocean acidification has the potential to cause dramatic changes in marine ecosystems. Larval damselfish exposed to concentrations of CO(2) predicted to occur in the mid- to late-century show maladaptive responses to predator cues. However, there is considerable variation both within and between species in CO(2) effects, whereby some individuals are unaffected at particular CO(2) concentrations while others show maladaptive responses to predator odour. Our goal was to test whether learning via chemical or visual information would be impaired by ocean acidification and ultimately, whether learning can mitigate the effects of ocean acidification by restoring the appropriate responses of prey to predators. Using two highly efficient and widespread mechanisms for predator learning, we compared the behaviour of pre-settlement damselfish Pomacentrus amboinensis that were exposed to 440 µatm CO(2) (current day levels) or 850 µatm CO(2), a concentration predicted to occur in the ocean before the end of this century. We found that, regardless of the method of learning, damselfish exposed to elevated CO(2) failed to learn to respond appropriately to a common predator, the dottyback, Pseudochromis fuscus. To determine whether the lack of response was due to a failure in learning or rather a short-term shift in trade-offs preventing the fish from displaying overt antipredator responses, we conditioned 440 or 700 µatm-CO(2) fish to learn to recognize a dottyback as a predator using injured conspecific cues, as in Experiment 1. When tested one day post-conditioning, CO(2) exposed fish failed to respond to predator odour. When tested 5 days post-conditioning, CO(2) exposed fish still failed to show an antipredator response to the dottyback odour, despite the fact that both control and CO(2)-treated fish responded to a general risk cue (injured conspecific cues). These results indicate that exposure to CO(2) may alter the cognitive ability of juvenile fish and render learning ineffective.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 247 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 237 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 51 21%
Student > Master 47 19%
Researcher 46 19%
Student > Bachelor 37 15%
Unspecified 18 7%
Other 48 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 146 59%
Environmental Science 57 23%
Unspecified 23 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 1%
Other 9 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 May 2016.
All research outputs
#397,791
of 12,091,105 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#7,914
of 133,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,434
of 258,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#182
of 3,996 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,091,105 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 133,011 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,334 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,996 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.