↓ Skip to main content

Development of 5‘ LTR DNA methylation of latent HIV-1 provirus in cell line models and in long-term-infected individuals

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Development of 5‘ LTR DNA methylation of latent HIV-1 provirus in cell line models and in long-term-infected individuals
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13148-016-0185-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kateřina Trejbalová, Denisa Kovářová, Jana Blažková, Ladislav Machala, David Jilich, Jan Weber, Dana Kučerová, Ondřej Vencálek, Ivan Hirsch, Jiří Hejnar, Trejbalová, Kateřina, Kovářová, Denisa, Blažková, Jana, Machala, Ladislav, Jilich, David, Weber, Jan, Kučerová, Dana, Vencálek, Ondřej, Hirsch, Ivan, Hejnar, Jiří

Abstract

Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) latency represents the major barrier to virus eradication in infected individuals because cells harboring latent HIV-1 provirus are not affected by current antiretroviral therapy (ART). We previously demonstrated that DNA methylation of HIV-1 long terminal repeat (5' LTR) restricts HIV-1 reactivation and, together with chromatin conformation, represents an important mechanism of HIV-1 latency maintenance. Here, we explored the new issue of temporal development of DNA methylation in latent HIV-1 5' LTR. In the Jurkat CD4(+) T cell model of latency, we showed that the stimulation of host cells contributed to de novo DNA methylation of the latent HIV-1 5' LTR sequences. Consecutive stimulations of model CD4(+) T cell line with TNF-α and PMA or with SAHA contributed to the progressive accumulation of 5' LTR DNA methylation. Further, we showed that once established, the high DNA methylation level of the latent 5' LTR in the cell line model was a stable epigenetic mark. Finally, we explored the development of 5' LTR DNA methylation in the latent reservoir of HIV-1-infected individuals who were treated with ART. We detected low levels of 5' LTR DNA methylation in the resting CD4(+) T cells of the group of patients who were treated for up to 3 years. However, after long-term ART, we observed an accumulation of 5' LTR DNA methylation in the latent reservoir. Importantly, within the latent reservoir of some long-term-treated individuals, we uncovered populations of proviral molecules with a high density of 5' LTR CpG methylation. Our data showed the presence of 5' LTR DNA methylation in the long-term reservoir of HIV-1-infected individuals and implied that the transient stimulation of cells harboring latent proviruses may contribute, at least in part, to the methylation of the HIV-1 promoter.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 2%
Unknown 47 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 29%
Student > Master 9 19%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 6 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 9 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2016.
All research outputs
#3,161,822
of 7,269,211 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#259
of 364 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#121,108
of 283,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#32
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,269,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 364 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,807 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.