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K13 mutations and pfmdr1 copy number variation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Myanmar

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
K13 mutations and pfmdr1 copy number variation in Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Myanmar
Published in
Malaria Journal, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1147-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Aye A. Win, Mallika Imwong, Myat P. Kyaw, Charles J. Woodrow, Kesinee Chotivanich, Borimas Hanboonkunupakarn, Sasithon Pukrittayakamee

Abstract

Artemisinin-based combination therapy has been first-line treatment for falciparum malaria in Myanmar since 2005. The wide extent of artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong sub-region and the presence of mefloquine resistance at the Myanmar-Thailand border raise concerns over resistance patterns in Myanmar. The availability of molecular markers for resistance to both drugs enables assessment even in remote malaria-endemic areas. A total of 250 dried blood spot samples collected from patients with Plasmodium falciparum malarial infection in five malaria-endemic areas across Myanmar were analysed for kelch 13 sequence (k13) and pfmdr1 copy number variation. K13 mutations in the region corresponding to amino acids 210-726 (including the propeller region of the protein) were detected by nested PCR amplification and sequencing, and pfmdr1 copy number variation by real-time PCR. In two sites, a sub-set of patients were prospectively followed up for assessment of day-3 parasite clearance rates after a standard course of artemether-lumefantrine. K13 mutations and pfmdr1 amplification were successfully analysed in 206 and 218 samples, respectively. Sixty-nine isolates (33.5 %) had mutations within the k13 propeller region with 53 of these (76.8 %) having mutations already known to be associated with artemisinin resistance. F446I (32 isolates) and P574L (15 isolates) were the most common examples. K13 mutation was less common in sites in western border regions (29 of 155 isolates) compared to samples from the east and north (40 of 51 isolates; p < 0.0001). The overall proportion of parasites with multiple pfmdr1 copies (greater than 1.5) was 5.5 %. Seven samples showed both k13 mutation and multiple copies of pfmdr1. Only one of 36 patients followed up after artemether-lumefantrine treatment still had parasites at day 3; molecular analysis indicated wild-type k13 and single copy pfmdr1. The proportion of P. falciparum isolates with mutations in the propeller region of k13 indicates that artemisinin resistance extends across much of Myanmar. There is a low prevalence of parasites with multiple pfmdr1 copies across the country. The efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy containing mefloquine and lumefantrine is, therefore, expected to be high, although regular monitoring of efficacy will be important.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 25%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Master 7 12%
Unspecified 6 10%
Other 12 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 17%
Unspecified 8 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 February 2016.
All research outputs
#2,796,747
of 7,289,383 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,037
of 2,432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,203
of 282,588 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#75
of 173 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,289,383 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 60th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,432 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,588 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 173 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.