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Neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
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Title
Neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd008139.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vanitha A Jagannath, G V Asokan, Zbys Fedorowicz, Tim WR Lee

Abstract

Cystic fibrosis is the most common, life-threatening, recessively inherited disease of Caucasian populations. It is a multisystem disorder caused by a mutation in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein which is important in producing sweat, digestive juices and mucus.The impaired or absent function of this protein results in the production of viscous mucus within the lungs and an environment that is susceptible to chronic airway obstruction and pulmonary colonization by a range of pathogenic bacteria. Morbidity and mortality of cystic fibrosis is related to chronic pulmonary sepsis and its complications by these bacteria.Influenza can worsen the course of the disease in cystic fibrosis by increasing the risk of pneumonia and secondary respiratory complications. Antiviral agents form an important part of influenza management and include the neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir and oseltamivir. These inhibitors can limit the infection and prevent the spread of the virus. To assess the effects of neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 02 November 2015. Randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing neuraminidase inhibitors with placebo or other antiviral drugs. Two review authors had planned to independently screen studies, extract data and assess risk of bias using standard Cochrane methodologies. No studies were identified for inclusion. No relevant studies were retrieved after a comprehensive search of the literature. We were unable to identify any randomised controlled studies or quasi-randomised controlled studies on the efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors for the treatment of influenza infection in people with cystic fibrosis. The absence of high level evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions emphasises the need for well-designed, adequately powered, randomised controlled clinical studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 21%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Master 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 10%
Psychology 3 6%
Decision Sciences 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 13 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2016.
All research outputs
#3,484,529
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#6,202
of 8,923 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,723
of 267,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#123
of 176 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,923 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.2. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,737 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 176 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.