↓ Skip to main content

Overdiagnosis of asthma in children in primary care: a retrospective analysis

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of General Practice, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,900)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
68 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
12 Mendeley
Title
Overdiagnosis of asthma in children in primary care: a retrospective analysis
Published in
British Journal of General Practice, March 2016
DOI 10.3399/bjgp16x683965
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ingrid Looijmans-van den Akker, Karen van Luijn, Theo Verheij, Looijmans-van den Akker, Ingrid, van Luijn, Karen, Verheij, Theo, I. Looijmans-van den Akker, K. van Luijn, T. Verheij

Abstract

Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in childhood. According to guidelines, a diagnosis of asthma should be confirmed using lung function testing in children aged >6 years. Previous studies indicate that asthma in children is probably overdiagnosed. However, the extent has not previously been assessed. To assess the extent and characteristics of confirmed and unconfirmed diagnoses of asthma in children who were diagnosed by their GP as having asthma or who were treated as having asthma. Retrospective analysis in four academic primary healthcare centres in Utrecht, the Netherlands. Routine care registration data of children aged 6-18 years who received a diagnosis of asthma or were treated as having asthma were analysed. In only 16.1% (n = 105) of the children diagnosed with asthma was the diagnosis confirmed with spirometry, whereas in 23.2% (n = 151) the signs and symptoms did give rise to suspected asthma but the children should have undergone further lung function tests. In more one-half (53.5%, n = 349) of the children the signs and symptoms made asthma unlikely and thus they were most likely overdiagnosed. The remaining 7.2% (n = 47) were probably correctly classified as not having asthma. The main reasons for classifying asthma without children undergoing further lung function tests were dyspnoea (31.9%, n = 174), cough (26.0%, n = 142), and wheezing (10.4%, n = 57). Overdiagnosis of childhood asthma is common in primary care, leading to unnecessary treatment, disease burden, and impact on quality of life. However, only in a small percentage of children is a diagnosis of asthma confirmed by lung function tests.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 68 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 17%
Unknown 10 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 25%
Other 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Student > Master 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Other 4 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 58%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 17%
Unspecified 1 8%
Physics and Astronomy 1 8%
Social Sciences 1 8%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 311. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2017.
All research outputs
#18,167
of 8,089,256 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of General Practice
#4
of 1,900 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,388
of 287,614 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of General Practice
#1
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,089,256 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,900 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,614 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.