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Changes in dermal matrix in the absence of Rac1 in keratinocytes

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Anatomy, February 2016
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Title
Changes in dermal matrix in the absence of Rac1 in keratinocytes
Published in
Journal of Anatomy, February 2016
DOI 10.1111/joa.12442
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alanna Stanley, Esben Pedersen, Cord Brakebusch, Fabio Quondamatteo

Abstract

Keratinocytes, in response to irritants, secrete pro-inflammatory mediators which recruit and activate immune and mesenchymal cells, including fibroblasts, to repair the skin. Fibroblasts respond by synthesising collagen and promoting the crosslinking extracellular matrix (ECM). We recently showed that the deletion of Rac1 in keratinocytes causes heightened inflammation due to aberrant crosstalk with immune cells. Indeed, the skin of these mice shows a higher inflammatory response to the induction of irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), and also even to treatment with a vehicle alone, compared with controls. As inflammation is intimately linked with fibrotic disease in the skin, this raised the question as to whether this deletion may also affect the deposition and arrangement of the dermal ECM. This study assessed the effects of Rac1 deletion in keratinocytes and of the heightened inflammatory status by induction of ICD on the tissue localisation and arrangements of dermal collagen. Qualitative analysis did not reveal evidence for the formation of pathologies in the dermis. However, quantitative analysis did reveal some perturbations in the dermal matrix, namely that only the combination of the lack of Rac1 and ICD affects the architectural organisation of the dermal collagen, and that a higher inflammatory state in the tissue (i.e. when Rac1 is deleted in the keratinocytes or ICD is induced in the skin, or a combination of both) influences the diameter of the collagen fibrils. It is proposed that this increase in the diameter of collagen fibrils due to inflammation may serve as pre-fibrotic marker enabling earlier determination of fibrosis and earlier treatment. This study has revealed previously unknown effects on the ECM due to the deletion of Rac1 in keratinocytes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 17%
Unknown 5 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 33%
Researcher 2 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 17%
Librarian 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 83%
Engineering 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2016.
All research outputs
#9,864,465
of 12,355,060 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Anatomy
#1,185
of 1,422 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#199,948
of 285,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Anatomy
#38
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,355,060 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,422 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 5th percentile – i.e., 5% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.