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Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Salt Marshes Exposed to Chronic Nutrient Enrichment

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, February 2016
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Title
Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Salt Marshes Exposed to Chronic Nutrient Enrichment
Published in
PLOS ONE, February 2016
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0149937
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gail L. Chmura, Lisa Kellman, Lee van Ardenne, Glenn R. Guntenspergen

Abstract

We assessed the impact of nutrient additions on greenhouse gas fluxes using dark static chambers in a microtidal and a macrotidal marsh along the coast of New Brunswick, Canada approximately monthly over a year. Both were experimentally fertilized for six years with varying levels of N and P. For unfertilized, N and NPK treatments, average yearly CO2 emissions (which represent only respiration) at the microtidal marsh (13, 19, and 28 mmoles CO2 m-2 hr-1, respectively) were higher than at the macrotidal marsh (12, 15, and 19 mmoles m-2 hr-1, respectively, with a flux under the additional high N/low P treatment of 21 mmoles m-2 hr-1). Response of CH4 to fertilization was more variable. At the macrotidal marsh average yearly fluxes were 1.29, 1.26, and 0.77 μmol CH4 m-2 hr-1 with control, N, and NPK treatments, respectively and 1.21 μmol m-2 hr-1 under high N/low P treatment. At the microtidal marsh CH4 fluxes were 0.23, 0.16, and -0.24 μmol CH4 m-2 hr-1 in control, N, and NPK and treatments, respectively. Fertilization changed soils from sinks to sources of N2O. Average yearly N2O fluxes at the macrotidal marsh were -0.07, 0.08, and 1.70, μmol N2O m-2 hr-1 in control, N, NPK and treatments, respectively and 0.35 μmol m-2 hr-1 under high N/low P treatment. For the control, N, and NPK treatments at the microtidal marsh N2O fluxes were -0.05, 0.30, and 0.52 μmol N2O m-2 hr-1, respectively. Our results indicate that N2O fluxes are likely to vary with the source of pollutant nutrients but emissions will be lower if N is not accompanied by an adequate supply of P (e.g., atmospheric deposition vs sewage or agricultural runoff). With chronic fertilization the global warming potential of the increased N2O emissions may be enough to offset the global cooling potential of the C sequestered by salt marshes.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 96 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Saudi Arabia 1 1%
Unknown 94 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 20 21%
Student > Master 19 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 12 13%
Unknown 14 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 38 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 14%
Social Sciences 4 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 16 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2016.
All research outputs
#15,950,187
of 20,585,116 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#131,167
of 177,676 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#185,376
of 277,765 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#3,907
of 5,286 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,585,116 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,676 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,765 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5,286 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.