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Moving interdisciplinary science forward: integrating participatory modelling with mathematical modelling of zoonotic disease in Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
107 Mendeley
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Title
Moving interdisciplinary science forward: integrating participatory modelling with mathematical modelling of zoonotic disease in Africa
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, February 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0110-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Grant, Catherine, Lo Iacono, Giovanni, Dzingirai, Vupenyu, Bett, Bernard, Winnebah, Thomas R. A., Atkinson, Peter M.

Abstract

This review outlines the benefits of using multiple approaches to improve model design and facilitate multidisciplinary research into infectious diseases, as well as showing and proposing practical examples of effective integration. It looks particularly at the benefits of using participatory research in conjunction with traditional modelling methods to potentially improve disease research, control and management. Integrated approaches can lead to more realistic mathematical models which in turn can assist with making policy decisions that reduce disease and benefit local people. The emergence, risk, spread and control of diseases are affected by many complex bio-physical, environmental and socio-economic factors. These include climate and environmental change, land-use variation, changes in population and people's behaviour. The evidence base for this scoping review comes from the work of a consortium, with the aim of integrating modelling approaches traditionally used in epidemiological, ecological and development research. A total of five examples of the impacts of participatory research on the choice of model structure are presented. Example 1 focused on using participatory research as a tool to structure a model. Example 2 looks at identifying the most relevant parameters of the system. Example 3 concentrates on identifying the most relevant regime of the system (e.g., temporal stability or otherwise), Example 4 examines the feedbacks from mathematical models to guide participatory research and Example 5 goes beyond the so-far described two-way interplay between participatory and mathematical approaches to look at the integration of multiple methods and frameworks. This scoping review describes examples of best practice in the use of participatory methods, illustrating their potential to overcome disciplinary hurdles and promote multidisciplinary collaboration, with the aim of making models and their predictions more useful for decision-making and policy formulation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 104 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 23%
Student > Master 19 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 16%
Student > Postgraduate 12 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 11 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 21%
Social Sciences 15 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 11%
Environmental Science 7 7%
Other 21 20%
Unknown 15 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,627,299
of 13,851,031 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#52
of 490 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,449
of 267,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,851,031 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 490 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,093 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.