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Salmonella Typhi-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cells play a dominant role in protection from typhoid fever in humans

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
45 Mendeley
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Title
Salmonella Typhi-specific multifunctional CD8+ T cells play a dominant role in protection from typhoid fever in humans
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0819-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie Fresnay, Monica A. McArthur, Laurence Magder, Thomas C. Darton, Claire Jones, Claire S. Waddington, Christoph J. Blohmke, Brian Angus, Myron M. Levine, Andrew J. Pollard, Marcelo B. Sztein

Abstract

Typhoid fever, caused by the human-restricted organism Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), is a major public health problem worldwide. Development of novel vaccines remains imperative, but is hampered by an incomplete understanding of the immune responses that correlate with protection. Recently, a controlled human infection model was re-established in which volunteers received ~10(3) cfu wild-type S. Typhi (Quailes strain) orally. Twenty-one volunteers were evaluated for their cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses. Ex vivo PBMC isolated before and up to 1 year after challenge were exposed to three S. Typhi-infected targets, i.e., autologous B lymphoblastoid cell-lines (B-LCL), autologous blasts and HLA-E restricted AEH B-LCL cells. CMI responses were evaluated using 14-color multiparametric flow cytometry to detect simultaneously five intracellular cytokines/chemokines (i.e., IL-17A, IL-2, IFN-g, TNF-a and MIP-1b) and a marker of degranulation/cytotoxic activity (CD107a). Herein we provide the first evidence that S. Typhi-specific CD8+ responses correlate with clinical outcome in humans challenged with wild-type S. Typhi. Higher multifunctional S. Typhi-specific CD8+ baseline responses were associated with protection against typhoid and delayed disease onset. Moreover, following challenge, development of typhoid fever was accompanied by decreases in circulating S. Typhi-specific CD8+ T effector/memory (TEM) with gut homing potential, suggesting migration to the site(s) of infection. In contrast, protection against disease was associated with low or no changes in circulating S. Typhi-specific TEM. These studies provide novel insights into the protective immune responses against typhoid disease that will aid in selection and development of new vaccine candidates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Researcher 9 20%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 27%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 12 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2017.
All research outputs
#870,612
of 9,165,968 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#124
of 1,974 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,413
of 290,496 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#3
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,165,968 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,974 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,496 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.