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Short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and short-term high-fat diet perturb mitochondrial energy metabolism and transcriptional control of lipid-handling in liver

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, March 2016
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Title
Short chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and short-term high-fat diet perturb mitochondrial energy metabolism and transcriptional control of lipid-handling in liver
Published in
Nutrition & Metabolism, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12986-016-0075-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sujoy Ghosh, Claudia Kruger, Shawna Wicks, Jacob Simon, K. Ganesh Kumar, William D. Johnson, Randall L. Mynatt, Robert C. Noland, Brenda K. Richards

Abstract

The liver is an important site of fat oxidation, which participates in the metabolic regulation of food intake. We showed previously that mice with genetically inactivated Acads, encoding short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD), shift food consumption away from fat and toward carbohydrate when tested in a macronutrient choice paradigm. This phenotypic eating behavior suggests a link between fat oxidation and nutrient choice which may involve an energy sensing mechanism. To identify hepatic processes that could trigger energy-related signals, we have now performed transcriptional, metabolite and physiological analyses in Acads-/- mice following short-term (2 days) exposure to either high- or low-fat diet. Metabolite analysis revealed 25 acylcarnitine species that were altered by diet and/or genotype. Compared to wild-type mice, phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase was 40 % higher in Acads-/- mice after short-term high-fat diet, indicating a low ATP/AMP ratio. Metabolite analyses in isolated liver mitochondria from Acads-/- mice during ADP-linked respiration on butyrate demonstrated a reduced oxygen consumption rate (OCR) compared to wild-type, an effect that was not observed with succinate or palmitoylcarnitine substrates. Liver transcriptomic responses in Acads-/- mice fed high- vs. lowfat diet revealed increased RXR/PPARA signaling, up-regulation of lipid handling pathways (including beta and omega oxidation), and increased mRNA expression of Nfe2l2 target genes. Together, these results point to an oxidative shortage in this genetic model and support the hypothesis of a lower hepatic energy state associated with SCAD deficiency and high-fat diet.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 29%
Researcher 6 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 16%
Student > Master 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Neuroscience 3 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,570,801
of 7,372,759 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition & Metabolism
#358
of 499 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,573
of 282,135 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition & Metabolism
#17
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,372,759 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 499 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,135 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.