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Self-reported exposure to pesticides in residential settings and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, June 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Self-reported exposure to pesticides in residential settings and risk of breast cancer: a case-control study
Published in
Environmental Health, June 2010
DOI 10.1186/1476-069x-9-30
Pubmed ID
Authors

Umar Farooq, Monika Joshi, Vinod Nookala, Pramil Cheriyath, Daniel Fischman, Nora J Graber, Steven D Stellman, Joshua Muscat

Abstract

Pesticides are widely used in households to control insects and weeds. Several studies, over the past decades, have examined the possible relationship of serum concentration of organochlorine pesticides and the development of breast cancer. However, little data exists regarding an association between self-reported, residential exposure to pesticides and breast cancer risk. We, therefore, present a case-control study examining self-reported exposure to household pesticides with regard to associated risk of breast cancer. This study was conducted in the area in and around New York City, NY and included 1205 patients (447 cases and 758 controls). Cases were defined as women with newly diagnosed breast cancer or carcinoma in-situ, while controls included women with benign breast diseases or those undergoing non-breast related surgery. All patients were asked a series of questions to determine their pesticide exposure, including the type of pesticide, location of exposure (inside vs. outside the home), who applied the pesticide (self vs. a professional) and duration of pesticide use. Logistic regression models were used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). The most common pests encountered in participants' homes were ants, carpenter ants, and cockroaches. The calculated adjusted odds ratios for both self and professionally applied pesticides, specifically against the above mentioned insects, with regard to breast cancer risk were 1.25 (95% CI: 0.79-1.98) and 1.06 (95% CI: 0.65-1.73), respectively. Similarly, odds ratios and confidence intervals were calculated for other types of pesticides. Overall, the results of our study did not show an association between self-reported exposure to pesticides and breast cancer risk. Future studies, utilizing a larger sample size and more specific detail on time frame of pesticide exposure, are needed to further explore this question.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
Nigeria 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 26%
Student > Master 6 22%
Other 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Professor 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 26%
Environmental Science 5 19%
Psychology 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Other 6 22%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2017.
All research outputs
#1,746,907
of 11,717,557 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#340
of 962 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,974
of 290,938 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#13
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,717,557 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 962 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,938 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.