↓ Skip to main content

More than a meal… integrating non-feeding interactions into food webs

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, February 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
237 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
631 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
More than a meal… integrating non-feeding interactions into food webs
Published in
Ecology Letters, February 2012
DOI 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01732.x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonia Kéfi, Eric L. Berlow, Evie A. Wieters, Sergio A. Navarrete, Owen L. Petchey, Spencer A. Wood, Alice Boit, Lucas N. Joppa, Kevin D. Lafferty, Richard J. Williams, Neo D. Martinez, Bruce A. Menge, Carol A. Blanchette, Alison C. Iles, Ulrich Brose

Abstract

Ecology Letters (2012) ABSTRACT: Organisms eating each other are only one of many types of well documented and important interactions among species. Other such types include habitat modification, predator interference and facilitation. However, ecological network research has been typically limited to either pure food webs or to networks of only a few (<3) interaction types. The great diversity of non-trophic interactions observed in nature has been poorly addressed by ecologists and largely excluded from network theory. Herein, we propose a conceptual framework that organises this diversity into three main functional classes defined by how they modify specific parameters in a dynamic food web model. This approach provides a path forward for incorporating non-trophic interactions in traditional food web models and offers a new perspective on tackling ecological complexity that should stimulate both theoretical and empirical approaches to understanding the patterns and dynamics of diverse species interactions in nature.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 631 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 2%
France 12 2%
Brazil 9 1%
Spain 6 <1%
United Kingdom 5 <1%
Switzerland 5 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
South Africa 3 <1%
Namibia 3 <1%
Other 22 3%
Unknown 549 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 162 26%
Researcher 155 25%
Student > Master 75 12%
Student > Bachelor 50 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 36 6%
Other 111 18%
Unknown 42 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 343 54%
Environmental Science 162 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 16 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 2%
Physics and Astronomy 9 1%
Other 23 4%
Unknown 67 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#896,442
of 16,118,909 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#624
of 2,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,889
of 125,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#2
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,118,909 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,421 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 125,626 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.