↓ Skip to main content

Selection of prey to improve biological parameters of the predatorPodisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in laboratory condit..

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 109)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
4 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Selection of prey to improve biological parameters of the predatorPodisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) in laboratory condit..
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia, March 2016
DOI 10.1590/1519-6984.12914
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bortoli, S A De, Vacari, A M, Laurentis, V L, Bortoli, C P De, Santos, R F, Otuka, A K

Abstract

Mass production of predatory stinkbugs in the laboratory is prioritized to release them into the field as part of IPM programs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the best prey for rearing the predator Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) among five different species of insect (three of Lepidoptera, one of Coleoptera, and one of Diptera). Second-instar P. nigrispinus nymphs were conditioned in transparent 1000-mL plastic pots, adults were placed in Petri dishes for mating, and both stages were maintained under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 12 hours of photophase, 70 ± 10% RH). Nymphs and adults of P. nigrispinus consumed more Musca domestica(Linnaeus, 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) larvae than the other tested prey. The consumption of fly larvae was 1.5 larvae/day/nymph and adults 1.7 larvae/day/adult. However, the number of eggs per female was less when the predator consumed M. domestica larvae (407.8 eggs/female) and most when consumed the Diatraea saccharalis (Fabricius, 1794) (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) larvae (797.7 eggs/female). Furthermore, the percentage of hatched eggs was greater when the predator females consumed D. saccharalis larvae (90.0%). D. saccharalis larvae is the best prey to rearing P. nigrispinus.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unknown 4 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,768,225
of 7,351,662 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia
#23
of 109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,870
of 280,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Biology = Revista Brasileira de Biologia
#2
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,351,662 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 109 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,860 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.