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Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation

Overview of attention for article published in Cerebral Cortex, March 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)
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Title
Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation
Published in
Cerebral Cortex, March 2016
DOI 10.1093/cercor/bhw035
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adam J. Kundishora, Abhijeet Gummadavelli, Chanthia Ma, Mengran Liu, Cian McCafferty, Nicholas D. Schiff, Jon T. Willie, Robert E. Gross, Jason Gerrard, Hal Blumenfeld

Abstract

Impaired consciousness occurs suddenly and unpredictably in people with epilepsy, markedly worsening quality of life and increasing risk of mortality. Focal seizures with impaired consciousness are the most common form of epilepsy and are refractory to all current medical and surgical therapies in about one-sixth of cases. Restoring consciousness during and following seizures would be potentially transformative for these individuals. Here, we investigate deep brain stimulation to improve level of conscious arousal in a rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that dual-site stimulation of the central lateral nucleus of the intralaminar thalamus (CL) and the pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) bilaterally during focal limbic seizures restored normal-appearing cortical electrophysiology and markedly improved behavioral arousal. In contrast, single-site bilateral stimulation of CL or PnO alone was insufficient to achieve the same result. These findings support the "network inhibition hypothesis" that focal limbic seizures impair consciousness through widespread inhibition of subcortical arousal. Driving subcortical arousal function would be a novel therapeutic approach to some forms of refractory epilepsy and may be compatible with devices already in use for responsive neurostimulation. Multisite deep brain stimulation of subcortical arousal structures may benefit not only patients with epilepsy but also those with other disorders of consciousness.

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The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 104 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 18%
Researcher 19 18%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Student > Postgraduate 8 7%
Other 26 24%
Unknown 18 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 35 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 10%
Psychology 9 8%
Engineering 6 6%
Other 6 6%
Unknown 20 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2022.
All research outputs
#13,605,001
of 24,271,113 outputs
Outputs from Cerebral Cortex
#2,856
of 5,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#135,090
of 303,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cerebral Cortex
#50
of 83 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,271,113 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,030 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 83 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.