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Comparative transcriptomics of the nematode gut identifies global shifts in feeding mode and pathogen susceptibility

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, March 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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19 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative transcriptomics of the nematode gut identifies global shifts in feeding mode and pathogen susceptibility
Published in
BMC Research Notes, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-1886-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

James W. Lightfoot, Veeren M. Chauhan, Jonathan W. Aylott, Christian Rödelsperger

Abstract

The nematode Pristionchus pacificus has been established as a model for comparative studies using the well known Caenorhabditis elegans as a reference. Despite their relatedness, previous studies have revealed highly divergent development and a number of morphological differences including the lack of a pharyngal structure, the grinder, used to physically lyse the ingested bacteria in C. elegans. To complement current knowledge about developmental and ecological differences with a better understanding of their feeding modes, we have sequenced the intestinal transcriptomes of both nematodes. In total, we found 464 intestine-enriched genes in P. pacificus and 724 in C. elegans, of which the majority (66 %) has been identified by previous studies. Interestingly, only 15 genes could be identified with shared intestinal enrichment in both species, of which three genes are Hedgehog signaling molecules supporting a highly conserved role of this pathway for intestinal development across all metazoa. At the level of gene families, we find similar divergent trends with only five families displaying significant intestinal enrichment in both species. We compared our data with transcriptomic responses to various pathogens. Strikingly, C. elegans intestine-enriched genes showed highly significant overlaps with pathogen response genes whereas this was not the case for P. pacificus, indicating shifts in pathogen susceptibility that might be explained by altered feeding modes. Our study reveals first insights into the evolution of feeding systems and the associated changes in intestinal gene expression that might have facilitated nematodes of the P. pacificus lineage to colonize new environments. These findings deepen our understanding about how morphological and genomic diversity is created during the course of evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 19 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 21%
Researcher 4 21%
Unspecified 3 16%
Student > Postgraduate 3 16%
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Other 3 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 53%
Unspecified 3 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Chemical Engineering 1 5%
Chemistry 1 5%
Other 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2016.
All research outputs
#1,406,482
of 7,367,623 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#336
of 1,872 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#70,473
of 280,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#24
of 113 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,367,623 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,872 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 113 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.