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A new method for assessing the impact of medial temporal lobe amnesia on the characteristics of generated autobiographical events.

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychologia, March 2016
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Title
A new method for assessing the impact of medial temporal lobe amnesia on the characteristics of generated autobiographical events.
Published in
Neuropsychologia, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2016.02.023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ariella Lenton-Brym, Jake Kurczek, Shayna Rosenbaum, Signy Sheldon, Lenton-Brym, Ariella, Kurczek, Jake, Rosenbaum, Shayna, Sheldon, Signy

Abstract

Constructing autobiographical events involves an initial phase of event selection, in which a memory or imagined future event is initially brought to mind, followed by a phase of elaboration, in which an individual accesses detailed knowledge specific to the event. While considerable research demonstrates the importance of the medial temporal lobes (MTL) in the later phase, its role in initial event selection is unknown. The present study is the first to investigate the role of the MTL in event selection by assessing whether individuals with MTL lesions select qualitatively different events for remembering and imagining than matched control participants. To do so, we created "event captions" that reflected the type of events selected for an autobiographical event narrative task by four individuals with MTL amnesia and control counterparts. Over 450 online raters assessed these event captions on qualitative dimensions known to vary with autobiographical recall (frequency, significance, emotionality, imageability and uniqueness). Our critical finding was that individuals with MTL amnesia were more prone to select events that were rated as more frequently occurring than healthy control participants. We interpret this finding as evidence that people with impaired episodic memory from MTL damage compensate for their compromised ability to recall detailed information by relying more heavily on semantic memory processes to select generalized events. We discuss the implications for theoretical models of memory and methodological approaches to studying autobiographical memory.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 5%
Unknown 18 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 21%
Researcher 4 21%
Student > Master 3 16%
Professor 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 2 11%
Other 4 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 74%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 11%
Unspecified 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Neuroscience 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,570,811
of 7,372,759 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychologia
#1,488
of 2,273 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,821
of 280,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychologia
#54
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,372,759 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,273 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.1. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,399 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.