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Experimental Lachesis muta rhombeata envenomation and effects of soursop (Annona muricata) as natural antivenom

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, March 2016
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Title
Experimental Lachesis muta rhombeata envenomation and effects of soursop (Annona muricata) as natural antivenom
Published in
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40409-016-0067-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caroline Marroni Cremonez, Flávia Pine Leite, Karla de Castro Figueiredo Bordon, Felipe Augusto Cerni, Iara Aimê Cardoso, Zita Maria de Oliveira Gregório, Rodrigo Cançado Gonçalves de Souza, Ana Maria de Souza, Eliane Candiani Arantes

Abstract

In the Atlantic forest of the North and Northeast regions of Brazil, local population often uses the fruit juice and the aqueous extract of leaves of soursop (Annona muricata L.) to treat Lachesis muta rhombeata envenomation. Envenomation is a relevant health issue in these areas, especially due to its severity and because the production and distribution of antivenom is limited in these regions. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relevance of the use of soursop leaf extract and its juice against envenomation by Lachesis muta rhombeata. We evaluated the biochemical, hematological and hemostatic parameters, the blood pressure, the inflammation process and the lethality induced by Lachesis muta rhombeata snake venom. We also assessed the action of the aqueous extract of leaves (AmL) and juice (AmJ) from A. muricata on the animal organism injected with L. m. rhombeata venom (LmrV) in the laboratory environment. LmrV induced a decrease of total protein, albumin and glucose; and increase of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and urea concentrations. It provoked hemoconcentration followed by reduction of hematocrit, an increase in prothrombin time and partial thromboplastin time and a decrease of the blood pressure. LmrV induced the release of interleukin-6, an increase in neutrophils and changes in the serum protein profile, characteristic of the acute inflammatory process. LD50 values were similar for the groups injected with LmrV and treated or untreated with AmJ and AmL. Both treatments play a role on the maintenance of blood glucose, urea and coagulation parameters and exert a protective action against the myotoxicity. However, they seem to worsen the hypotension caused by LmrV. The treatments with AmJ and AmL present some beneficial actions, but they might intensify some effects of the venom. Therefore, additional studies on A. muricata are necessary to enable its use as natural antivenom for bushmaster snakebite.

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Mendeley readers

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 20%
Student > Master 11 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 9 15%
Unknown 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 7%
Chemistry 3 5%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 20 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2016.
All research outputs
#19,944,091
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#396
of 539 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,489
of 313,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#9
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 539 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 313,892 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.