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Anopheles farauti is a homogeneous population that blood feeds early and outdoors in the Solomon Islands

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, March 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Anopheles farauti is a homogeneous population that blood feeds early and outdoors in the Solomon Islands
Published in
Malaria Journal, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1194-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tanya L. Russell, Nigel W. Beebe, Hugo Bugoro, Allan Apairamo, Frank H. Collins, Robert D. Cooper, Neil F. Lobo, Thomas R. Burkot

Abstract

In the 1970s, Anopheles farauti in the Solomon Island responded to indoor residual spraying with DDT by increasingly feeding more outdoors and earlier in the evening. Although long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) are now the primary malaria vector control intervention in the Solomon Islands, only a small proportion of An. farauti still seek blood meals indoors and late at night where they are vulnerable to being killed by contract with the insecticides in LLINs. The effectiveness of LLINs and indoor residual spraying (IRS) in controlling malaria transmission where the vectors are exophagic and early biting will depend on whether the predominant outdoor or early biting phenotypes are associated with a subpopulation of the vectors present. Mark-release-recapture experiments were conducted in the Solomon Islands to determine if individual An. farauti repeat the same behaviours over successive feeding cycles. The two behavioural phenotypes examined were those on which the WHO recommended malaria vector control strategies, LLINs and IRS, depend: indoor and late night biting. Evidence was found for An. farauti being a single population regarding time (early evening or late night) and location (indoor or outdoor) of blood feeding. Individual An. farauti did not consistently repeat behavioural phenotypes expressed for blood feeding (e.g., while most mosquitoes that fed early and outdoors, and would repeat those behaviours, some fed late at night or indoors in the next feeding cycle). The finding that An. farauti is a homogeneous population is significant, because during the multiple feeding cycles required to complete the extrinsic incubation period, many individual female anophelines will enter houses late at night and be exposed to the insecticides used in LLINs or IRS. This explains, in part, the control that LLINs and IRS have exerted against a predominantly outdoor feeding vector, such as An. farauti. These findings may be relevant to many of the outdoor feeding vectors that dominate transmission in much of the malaria endemic world and justifies continued use of LLINs. However, the population-level tendency of mosquitoes to feed outdoors and early in the evening does require complementary interventions to accelerate malaria control towards elimination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 August 2017.
All research outputs
#2,775,367
of 11,719,214 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#878
of 3,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,929
of 287,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#46
of 198 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,719,214 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,448 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,823 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 198 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.