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Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes)

Overview of attention for article published in PeerJ, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Updating movement estimates for American black ducks (Anas rubripes)
Published in
PeerJ, March 2016
DOI 10.7717/peerj.1787
Pubmed ID
Authors

Orin J. Robinson, Conor P. McGowan, Patrick K. Devers

Abstract

Understanding migratory connectivity for species of concern is of great importance if we are to implement management aimed at conserving them. New methods are improving our understanding of migration; however, banding (ringing) data is by far the most widely available and accessible movement data for researchers. Here, we use band recovery data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) from 1951-2011 and analyze their movement among seven management regions using a hierarchical Bayesian framework. We showed that black ducks generally exhibit flyway fidelity, and that many black ducks, regardless of breeding region, stopover or overwinter on the Atlantic coast of the United States. We also show that a non-trivial portion of the continental black duck population either does not move at all or moves to the north during the fall migration (they typically move to the south). The results of this analysis will be used in a projection modeling context to evaluate how habitat or harvest management actions in one region would propagate throughout the continental population of black ducks. This analysis may provide a guide for future research and help inform management efforts for black ducks as well as other migratory species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 23%
Other 2 15%
Student > Master 1 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 4 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Environmental Science 2 15%
Unknown 6 46%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,526,463
of 12,550,112 outputs
Outputs from PeerJ
#3,267
of 6,356 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,136
of 266,888 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PeerJ
#168
of 346 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,550,112 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,356 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,888 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 346 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.