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Biological Low-pH Mn(II) Oxidation in a Manganese Deposit Influenced by Metal-Rich Groundwater

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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1 patent

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Biological Low-pH Mn(II) Oxidation in a Manganese Deposit Influenced by Metal-Rich Groundwater
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2016
DOI 10.1128/aem.03844-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tsing Bohu, Denise M. Akob, Michael Abratis, Cassandre S. Lazar, Kirsten Küsel

Abstract

The mechanisms, key organisms, and geochemical significance of biological low pH Mn(II) oxidation are largely unexplored. Here we investigated the structure of indigenous Mn(II)-oxidizing microbial communities in a secondary subsurface Mn oxide deposit influenced by acidic (pH 4.8) metal-rich groundwater in a former uranium mining area. Microbial diversity was highest in the Mn deposit compared to the adjacent soil layers, and included the majority of known Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and two genera of known Mn(II)-oxidizing fungi (MOF). Electron X-ray microanalysis showed that romanechite (Ba,H2O)2(Mn(4+),Mn(3+))5O10) was conspicuously enriched in the deposit. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) revealed that certain fungal, bacterial, and archaeal groups were firmly associated with the autochthonous Mn oxides. Eight MOB within the Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes and one MOF strain belonging to Ascomycota were isolated at pH 5.5 or 7.2 from the acidic Mn deposit. Soil-groundwater microcosms had 2.5 times faster Mn(II) depletion in the Mn deposit compared to adjacent soil layers. No depletion was observed in the abiotic controls suggesting that biological contribution is the main driver for Mn(II) oxidation at low pH. The composition and species specificity of the native low pH Mn(II) oxidizers were highly adapted to in situ conditions and these organisms may play a central role in the fundamental biogeochemical processes (e.g., metal natural attenuation), occurring in the acidic, oligotrophic, and metalliferous subsoil ecosystem. This study provides multiple lines of evidence to show that microbes are the main drivers of Mn(II) oxidation even at acidic pH, offering new insights into Mn biogeochemical cycling. A distinct, highly adapted microbial community inhabits acidic, oligotrophic Mn deposits and mediates biological Mn oxidation. These data highlight the importance of biological processes for Mn biogeochemical cycling and show the potential for new bioremediation strategies aimed at enhancing biological Mn oxidation in low pH environments for contaminant mitigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Germany 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 21%
Student > Master 5 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Other 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 18%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Environmental Science 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2019.
All research outputs
#4,115,471
of 15,956,969 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#5,104
of 14,996 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,043
of 267,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#53
of 142 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,956,969 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,996 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,834 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 142 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.