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Abnormal movements in critical care patients with brain injury: a diagnostic approach

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
115 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
121 Mendeley
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Title
Abnormal movements in critical care patients with brain injury: a diagnostic approach
Published in
Critical Care, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1236-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yousef Hannawi, Michael S. Abers, Romergryko G. Geocadin, Marek A. Mirski

Abstract

Abnormal movements are frequently encountered in patients with brain injury hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs), yet characterization of these movements and their underlying pathophysiology is difficult due to the comatose or uncooperative state of the patient. In addition, the available diagnostic approaches are largely derived from outpatients with neurodegenerative or developmental disorders frequently encountered in the outpatient setting, thereby limiting the applicability to inpatients with acute brain injuries. Thus, we reviewed the available literature regarding abnormal movements encountered in acutely ill patients with brain injuries. We classified the brain injury into the following categories: anoxic, vascular, infectious, inflammatory, traumatic, toxic-metabolic, tumor-related and seizures. Then, we identified the abnormal movements seen in each category as well as their epidemiologic, semiologic and clinicopathologic correlates. We propose a practical paradigm that can be applied at the bedside for diagnosing abnormal movements in the ICU. This model seeks to classify observed abnormal movements in light of various patient-specific factors. It begins with classifying the patient's level of consciousness. Then, it integrates the frequency and type of each movement with the availability of ancillary diagnostic tests and the specific etiology of brain injury.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 115 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 117 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 15%
Other 17 14%
Student > Postgraduate 13 11%
Student > Master 9 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 7%
Other 35 29%
Unknown 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 67 55%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 7%
Neuroscience 7 6%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 2%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 25 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 85. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2022.
All research outputs
#424,175
of 22,912,409 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#265
of 6,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,569
of 299,594 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#5
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,912,409 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,072 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,594 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.