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Are white storks addicted to junk food? Impacts of landfill use on the movement and behaviour of resident white storks (Ciconia ciconia) from a partially migratory population

Overview of attention for article published in Movement Ecology, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 217)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
96 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
56 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
148 Mendeley
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Title
Are white storks addicted to junk food? Impacts of landfill use on the movement and behaviour of resident white storks (Ciconia ciconia) from a partially migratory population
Published in
Movement Ecology, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40462-016-0070-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathalie I. Gilbert, Ricardo A. Correia, João Paulo Silva, Carlos Pacheco, Inês Catry, Philip W. Atkinson, Jenny A. Gill, Aldina M. A. Franco

Abstract

The migratory patterns of animals are changing in response to global environmental change with many species forming resident populations in areas where they were once migratory. The white stork (Ciconia ciconia) was wholly migratory in Europe but recently guaranteed, year-round food from landfill sites has facilitated the establishment of resident populations in Iberia. In this study 17 resident white storks were fitted with GPS/GSM data loggers (including accelerometer) and tracked for 9.1 ± 3.7 months to quantify the extent and consistency of landfill attendance by individuals during the non-breeding and breeding seasons and to assess the influence of landfill use on daily distances travelled, percentage of GPS fixes spent foraging and non-landfill foraging ranges. Resident white storks used landfill more during non-breeding (20.1 % ± 2.3 of foraging GPS fixes) than during breeding (14.9 % ± 2.2). Landfill attendance declined with increasing distance between nest and landfill in both seasons. During non-breeding a large percentage of GPS fixes occurred on the nest throughout the day (27 % ± 3.0 of fixes) in the majority of tagged storks. This study provides first confirmation of year-round nest use by resident white storks. The percentage of GPS fixes on the nest was not influenced by the distance between nest and the landfill site. Storks travelled up to 48.2 km to visit landfills during non-breeding and a maximum of 28.1 km during breeding, notably further than previous estimates. Storks nesting close to landfill sites used landfill more and had smaller foraging ranges in non-landfill habitat indicating higher reliance on landfill. The majority of non-landfill foraging occurred around the nest and long distance trips were made specifically to visit landfill. The continuous availability of food resources on landfill has facilitated year-round nest use in white storks and is influencing their home ranges and movement behaviour. White storks rely on landfill sites for foraging especially during the non-breeding season when other food resources are scarcer and this artificial food supplementation probably facilitated the establishment of resident populations. The closure of landfills, as required by EU Landfill Directives, will likely cause dramatic impacts on white stork populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 56 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 148 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 141 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 43 29%
Student > Master 24 16%
Researcher 19 13%
Student > Bachelor 15 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 4%
Other 22 15%
Unknown 19 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 83 56%
Environmental Science 20 14%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 5 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 5 3%
Unknown 27 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 873. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#9,321
of 16,578,610 outputs
Outputs from Movement Ecology
#1
of 217 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#228
of 267,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Movement Ecology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,578,610 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 217 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,220 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them