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Sex determination strategies in 2012: towards a common regulatory model?

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2012
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1 tweeter

Citations

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110 Mendeley
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Title
Sex determination strategies in 2012: towards a common regulatory model?
Published in
Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1477-7827-10-13
Pubmed ID
Authors

Roxani Angelopoulou, Giagkos Lavranos, Panagiota Manolakou

Abstract

Sex determination is a complicated process involving large-scale modifications in gene expression affecting virtually every tissue in the body. Although the evolutionary origin of sex remains controversial, there is little doubt that it has developed as a process of optimizing metabolic control, as well as developmental and reproductive functions within a given setting of limited resources and environmental pressure. Evidence from various model organisms supports the view that sex determination may occur as a result of direct environmental induction or genetic regulation. The first process has been well documented in reptiles and fish, while the second is the classic case for avian species and mammals. Both of the latter have developed a variety of sex-specific/sex-related genes, which ultimately form a complete chromosome pair (sex chromosomes/gonosomes). Interestingly, combinations of environmental and genetic mechanisms have been described among different classes of animals, thus rendering the possibility of a unidirectional continuous evolutionary process from the one type of mechanism to the other unlikely. On the other hand, common elements appear throughout the animal kingdom, with regard to a) conserved key genes and b) a central role of sex steroid control as a prerequisite for ultimately normal sex differentiation. Studies in invertebrates also indicate a role of epigenetic chromatin modification, particularly with regard to alternative splicing options. This review summarizes current evidence from research in this hot field and signifies the need for further study of both normal hormonal regulators of sexual phenotype and patterns of environmental disruption.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Germany 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
New Caledonia 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Unknown 102 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 30 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 25%
Student > Master 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 66 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 20%
Environmental Science 6 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 <1%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 <1%
Other 4 4%
Unknown 10 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2012.
All research outputs
#3,108,836
of 4,505,992 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#199
of 282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,564
of 77,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology
#10
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,505,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 282 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 77,915 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.