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Fidgety movements – tiny in appearance, but huge in impact

Overview of attention for article published in Jornal de Pediatria, March 2016
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Title
Fidgety movements – tiny in appearance, but huge in impact
Published in
Jornal de Pediatria, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jped.2015.12.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christa Einspieler, Robert Peharz, Peter B. Marschik

Abstract

To describe fidgety movements (FMs), i.e., the spontaneous movement pattern that typically occurs at 3-5 months after term age, and discuss its clinical relevance. A comprehensive literature search was performed using the following databases: MEDLINE/PubMed, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Science Direct, PsycINFO, and EMBASE. The search strategy included the MeSH terms and search strings ('fidgety movement*') OR [('general movement*') AND ('three month*') OR ('3 month*')], as well as studies published on the General Movements Trust website (www.general-movements-trust.info). Virtually all infants develop normally if FMs are present and normal, even if their brain ultrasound findings and/or clinical histories indicate a disposition to later neurological deficits. Conversely, almost all infants who never develop FMs have a high risk for neurological deficits such as cerebral palsy, and for genetic disorders with a late onset. If FMs are normal but concurrent postural patterns are not age-adequate or the overall movement character is monotonous, cognitive and/or language skills at school age will be suboptimal. Abnormal FMs are unspecific and have a low predictive power, but occur exceedingly in infants later diagnosed with autism. Abnormal, absent, or sporadic FMs indicate an increased risk for later neurological dysfunction, whereas normal FMs are highly predictive of normal development, especially if they co-occur with other smooth and fluent movements. Early recognition of neurological signs facilitates early intervention. It is important to re-assure parents of infants with clinical risk factors that the neurological outcome will be adequate if FMs develop normally.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 73 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 6 8%
Researcher 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 7%
Other 17 23%
Unknown 25 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 18%
Psychology 7 10%
Engineering 3 4%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 25 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 March 2016.
All research outputs
#17,489,487
of 25,654,806 outputs
Outputs from Jornal de Pediatria
#499
of 901 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#202,339
of 330,670 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Jornal de Pediatria
#13
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,654,806 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 901 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,670 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.