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Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, August 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Available nitrogen is the key factor influencing soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest
Published in
BMC Microbiology, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0491-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Cong, Xueduan Liu, Hui Lu, Han Xu, Yide Li, Ye Deng, Diqiang Li, Yuguang Zhang

Abstract

Tropical rainforests cover over 50 % of all known plant and animal species and provide a variety of key resources and ecosystem services to humans, largely mediated by metabolic activities of soil microbial communities. A deep analysis of soil microbial communities and their roles in ecological processes would improve our understanding on biogeochemical elemental cycles. However, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforests and causative factors remain unclear. GeoChip, contained almost all of the key functional genes related to biogeochemical cycles, could be used as a specific and sensitive tool for studying microbial gene diversity and metabolic potential. In this study, soil microbial functional gene diversity in tropical rainforest was analyzed by using GeoChip technology. Gene categories detected in the tropical rainforest soils were related to different biogeochemical processes, such as carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling. The relative abundance of genes related to C and P cycling detected mostly derived from the cultured bacteria. C degradation gene categories for substrates ranging from labile C to recalcitrant C were all detected, and gene abundances involved in many recalcitrant C degradation gene categories were significantly (P < 0.05) different among three sampling sites. The relative abundance of genes related to N cycling detected was significantly (P < 0.05) different, mostly derived from the uncultured bacteria. The gene categories related to ammonification had a high relative abundance. Both canonical correspondence analysis and multivariate regression tree analysis showed that soil available N was the most correlated with soil microbial functional gene structure. Overall high microbial functional gene diversity and different soil microbial metabolic potential for different biogeochemical processes were considered to exist in tropical rainforest. Soil available N could be the key factor in shaping the soil microbial functional gene structure and metabolic potential.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 35 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 32%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 5%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 49%
Environmental Science 7 19%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,377,927
of 7,424,901 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#522
of 1,259 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,660
of 276,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#29
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,424,901 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,259 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.