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Prognostic factors and disease-specific survival among immigrants diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Cancer, March 2016
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Title
Prognostic factors and disease-specific survival among immigrants diagnosed with cutaneous malignant melanoma in Sweden
Published in
International Journal of Cancer, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/ijc.30103
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simberg‐Danell, Caroline, Lyth, Johan, Månsson‐Brahme, Eva, Frohm‐Nilsson, Margareta, Carstensen, John, Hansson, Johan, Eriksson, Hanna

Abstract

Little is known about cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) among immigrants in Europe. We aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and disease-specific survival among first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden This nationwide population-based study included 27,235 patients from the Swedish Melanoma Register diagnosed with primary invasive CMM 1990-2007. Data were linked to nationwide, population-based registers followed up through 2013. Logistic regression and Cox regression models were used to determine the association between immigrant status and stage and CMM prognosis, respectively. stage. After adjustments for confounders, first generation immigrant from Southern Europe were associated with significantly more advanced stages of disease compared to Swedish-born patients (Stage II vs I: Odds ratio (OR)=2.37, 95% CI=1.61 to 3.50. Stage III-IV vs I: OR=2.40, 95% CI = 1.08-5.37). stageThe ORsof stage II-IV vs stage I disease were increased among men (OR=1.9; 95% CI=1.1 - 3.3; P=0.020), and inwomen (OR=4.8; 95% CI=2.6 - 9.1; P < 0.001) in a subgroup of immigrants from former Yugoslavia compared to Swedish-born patients. In conclusion, the CMM-specific survival was significantly decreased among women from former Yugoslavia compared to Swedish-born women (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.2; 95% CI=1.1 - 4.2; P=0.043). After additional adjustment including stage, the survival difference was no longer significant. No survival difference between the second generation immigrant group and Swedish-born patients were observed. A worse CMM-specific survival in women from former Yugoslavia was associated with more advanced stages of CMM at diagnosis. Secondary prevention efforts focusing on specific groups may be needed to further improve CMM prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 2 40%
Lecturer 1 20%
Professor 1 20%
Researcher 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 80%
Unspecified 1 20%