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Hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, March 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#25 of 651)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
3 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
8 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
387 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
611 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Hemodynamic parameters to guide fluid therapy
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, March 2011
DOI 10.1186/2110-5820-1-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul E Marik, Xavier Monnet, Jean-Louis Teboul

Abstract

The clinical determination of the intravascular volume can be extremely difficult in critically ill and injured patients as well as those undergoing major surgery. This is problematic because fluid loading is considered the first step in the resuscitation of hemodynamically unstable patients. Yet, multiple studies have demonstrated that only approximately 50% of hemodynamically unstable patients in the intensive care unit and operating room respond to a fluid challenge. Whereas under-resuscitation results in inadequate organ perfusion, accumulating data suggest that over-resuscitation increases the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Cardiac filling pressures, including the central venous pressure and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, have been traditionally used to guide fluid management. However, studies performed during the past 30 years have demonstrated that cardiac filling pressures are unable to predict fluid responsiveness. During the past decade, a number of dynamic tests of volume responsiveness have been reported. These tests dynamically monitor the change in stroke volume after a maneuver that increases or decreases venous return (preload) and challenges the patients' Frank-Starling curve. These dynamic tests use the change in stroke volume during mechanical ventilation or after a passive leg raising maneuver to assess fluid responsiveness. The stroke volume is measured continuously and in real-time by minimally invasive or noninvasive technologies, including Doppler methods, pulse contour analysis, and bioreactance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 611 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Ecuador 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Other 14 2%
Unknown 579 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 95 16%
Other 90 15%
Researcher 88 14%
Student > Master 61 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 58 9%
Other 159 26%
Unknown 60 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 458 75%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 3%
Engineering 10 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 1%
Other 26 4%
Unknown 71 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 50. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2019.
All research outputs
#406,525
of 14,709,008 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#25
of 651 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,440
of 121,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,709,008 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 651 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them