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Breastfeeding, bottle feeding and risk of malocclusion in mixed and permanent dentitions: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
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Title
Breastfeeding, bottle feeding and risk of malocclusion in mixed and permanent dentitions: a systematic review
Published in
Brazilian Oral Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1590/1807-3107bor-2016.vol30.0022
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucas Guimarães ABREU, Saul Martins PAIVA, Isabela Almeida PORDEUS, Carolina Castro MARTINS

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to search for scientific evidence concerning the association between breastfeeding and bottle feeding and risk of malocclusion in mixed and permanent dentitions. An electronic search was performed in eight databases up to February 2015. Additionally, a gray literature search and hand searches of the reference lists of the selected studies were also carried out. There were no restrictions on language or on year of publication. The methodology of the included articles was evaluated using the Newcastle Ottawa scale. Out of the 817 identified citations, six studies fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review. One study showed that children with mixed and permanent dentitions breastfed for more than 6 months presented greater mean protrusion of mandibular incisors and inclination of maxillary incisors compared with those breastfed for less than 6 months or those who were bottle-fed (p < 0.05). One study revealed that breastfeeding and bruxism were associated with Class II [OR = 3.14 (1.28 - 7.66)] and Class III [OR = 2.78 (1.21 - 6.36)] malocclusion in children with permanent dentition, while another study showed that an increase in breastfeeding duration was associated with a lower risk of malocclusion in children with both mixed and permanent dentitions (p < 0.001). Three studies did not report any significant association. Risk of bias was high in most selected articles. These findings do not support an association between breastfeeding and bottle feeding and the occurrence of malocclusion in mixed and permanent dentitions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Uruguay 1 <1%
Unknown 138 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 15%
Student > Postgraduate 18 13%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 39 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 70 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Engineering 3 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 <1%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 43 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2017.
All research outputs
#11,948,438
of 13,475,838 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Oral Research
#121
of 148 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,058
of 267,333 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Oral Research
#5
of 8 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 148 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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