↓ Skip to main content

Linking field‐based metabolomics and chemical analyses to prioritize contaminants of emerging concern in the Great Lakes basin

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
24 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Linking field‐based metabolomics and chemical analyses to prioritize contaminants of emerging concern in the Great Lakes basin
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/etc.3409
Pubmed ID
Authors

Davis, John M., Ekman, Drew R., Teng, Quincy, Ankley, Gerald T., Berninger, Jason P., Cavallin, Jenna E., Jensen, Kathleen M., Kahl, Michael D., Schroeder, Anthony L., Villeneuve, Daniel L., Jorgenson, Zachary G., Lee, Kathy E., Collette, Timothy W., Davis, John M, Ekman, Drew R, Ankley, Gerald T, Berninger, Jason P, Cavallin, Jenna E, Jensen, Kathleen M, Kahl, Michael D, Schroeder, Anthony L, Villeneuve, Daniel L, Jorgenson, Zachary G, Lee, Kathy E, Collette, Timothy W

Abstract

The ability to focus on the most biologically relevant contaminants affecting aquatic ecosystems can be challenging because toxicity assessment programs have not kept pace with the growing number of contaminants requiring testing. Because it has proven effective in assessing biological impacts of potentially toxic contaminants, profiling of endogenous metabolites (metabolomics) may help screen out contaminants with a lower likelihood of eliciting biological impacts, thereby prioritizing the most biologically-important contaminants. We present results from a study that utilized cage-deployed fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) at 18 sites across the Great Lakes basin. We measured water temperature and contaminant concentrations in water samples (132 contaminants targeted; 86 detected), and used (1) H-NMR spectroscopy to measure endogenous metabolites in polar extracts of livers. We used partial least-squares (PLS) regression to compare relative abundances of endogenous metabolites with contaminant concentrations and temperature. Results indicated that profiles of endogenous polar metabolites covaried with at most 49 contaminants. Thus, we identified up to 52% of detected contaminants as not significantly covarying with changes in endogenous metabolites, suggesting they likely were not eliciting measureable impacts at these sites. This represents a first step in screening for the biological-relevance of detected contaminants by shortening lists of contaminants potentially affecting these sites. Such information may allow risk assessors to prioritize contaminants and focus toxicity testing on the most biologically-relevant contaminants. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 6 25%
Student > Master 6 25%
Researcher 5 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 8 33%
Environmental Science 7 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Chemistry 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,546,413
of 8,514,100 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#1,499
of 2,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,694
of 280,567 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#22
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,514,100 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 58th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,787 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,567 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.