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HCV monoinfection and HIV/HCV coinfection enhance T-cell immune senescence in injecting drug users early during infection

Overview of attention for article published in Immunity & Ageing, March 2016
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Title
HCV monoinfection and HIV/HCV coinfection enhance T-cell immune senescence in injecting drug users early during infection
Published in
Immunity & Ageing, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12979-016-0065-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bart P. X. Grady, Bart P. X. Grady, Nening M. Nanlohy, Debbie van Baarle

Abstract

Injecting drug users (IDU) are at premature risk of developing multimorbidity and mortality from causes commonly observed in the elderly. Ageing of the immune system (immune-senescence) can lead to premature morbidity and mortality and can be accelerated by chronic viral infections. Here we investigated the impact of HCV monoinfection and HIV/HCV coinfection on immune parameters in (ex-) IDU. We analyzed telomere length and expression of activation, differentiation and exhaustion markers on T cells at baseline (t = 1) and at follow-up (t = 2) (median interval 16.9 years) in IDU who were: HCV mono-infected (n = 21); HIV/HCV coinfected (n = 23) or multiple exposed but uninfected (MEU) (n = 8). The median time interval between t = 1 and t = 2 was 16.9 years. Telomere length within CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells decreased significantly over time in all IDU groups (p ≤ 0.012). CD4(+) T-cell telomere length in HCV mono-infected IDU was significantly reduced compared to healthy donors at t = 1 (p < 0.008). HIV/HCV coinfected IDU had reduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell telomere lengths (p ≤ 0.002) to healthy donors i at t = 1. This was related to persistent levels of immune activation but not due to increased differentiation of T cells over time. Telomere length decrease was observed within all T-cell subsets, but mainly found in immature T cells (CD27(+)CD57(+)) (p ≤ 0.015). HCV mono-infection and HIV/HCV coinfection enhance T-cell immune-senescence. Our data suggest that this occurred early during infection, which warrants early treatment for both HCV and HIV to reduce immune senescence in later life.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 14%
Researcher 6 14%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 10 23%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 36%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Unspecified 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,656,091
of 7,474,500 outputs
Outputs from Immunity & Ageing
#92
of 124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,629
of 272,638 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Immunity & Ageing
#12
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,474,500 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,638 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.